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Retinoic acid may significantly prevent lymphedema development, experimental model suggests

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Using newly updated mouse models, researchers demonstrated the impactful preventive properties of 9-cis retinoic acid against lymphedema. Currently, there is no cure for lymphedema, a swelling of the extremities that most commonly occurs after treatment for cancer.

Quelle: Retinoic acid may significantly prevent lymphedema development, experimental model suggests

 

A study conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) showed that 9-cis retinoic acid (alitretinoin) could significantly prevent postsurgical lymphedema. Furthermore, the experiments were conducted with updated, easily reproducible mouse models that more accurately simulated lymphedema development in humans. The National Institutes of Health-funded study was published in the Annals of Surgery.

Lymphedema occurs when damaged lymph nodes are unable to drain properly, causing swelling and tissue buildup. Lymphedema affects 140 million individuals globally, including 5 million people in the United States whose lymphedema is related to cancer-related lymphadenectomy. As surgical developments continue to increase cancer survival rates, the prevalence of lymphedema is expected to rise. And with no known cure for post-surgical lymphedema, lymph node dysfunction can negatively impact long-term quality of life.

„Physically, lymphedema is both uncomfortable and inconvenient,“ said Alex Wong, MD, assistant professor of surgery at Keck School of Medicine and one of the co-corresponding authors of the study. „Some patients express frustration at things we take for granted, like getting dressed. And for many of them, the swollen and deformed extremity is an unwelcome reminder of the cancer they fought or are still fighting.“

To examine the effect of alitretinoin, the research team induced lymphedema by making a small incision in the hind legs of mice rather than the base of the tail, as previous studies had done. This updated model better simulated lymph node dysfunction in humans in that rodent tails are not subject to the effects of gravity to the same extent as human arms and legs. And more simply, humans do not have a tail.

„Developing a more effective model for lymphedema research is as much of an achievement from our research as illustrating the potential benefits of retinoic acid,“ said Young-Kwon Hong, PhD, associate professor of surgery at Keck School of Medicine and co-corresponding author of the study. Hong previously illustrated the potential benefits of alitretinoin on preventing lymphedema in petri-dish models before developing the mouse model.

After the hind paw incisions were repaired, the mice were divided into two groups. One group received daily injections of 9-cis retinoic acid, while the other received a vehicle solution as a control. The mice treated with the retinoic acid experienced less postsurgical edema and significantly less paw lymphedema compared to the control group. Moreover, the mice treated with the retinoic acid had much faster lymphatic drainage and increased lymphatic vessel density.

„Lymphatic drainage and maintenance of the integrity of the lymphatic vessels are two key factors in preventing lymphedema,“ Hong said. „9-cis retinoic acid’s ability to accomplish both makes it a promising treatment option.“

Alitretinoin is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of skin lesions in acquired immune deficiency syndrome-related Kaposi’s sarcoma and eczema. If further studies prove fruitful, Wong hopes to establish a clinical trial for alitretinoin as a preventive measure against lymphedema.

„Our immediate next step is to experiment with timing,“ Wong said. „Currently, physicians watch and wait for lymphedema, but our study suggests that treatment at the time of surgery may be a more effective course.“


Story Source:

Materials provided by Keck Medicine of USC. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Athanasios Bramos, David Perrault, Sara Yang, Eunson Jung, Young Kwon Hong, Alex K. Wong. Prevention of Postsurgical Lymphedema by 9-cis Retinoic Acid. Annals of Surgery, 2016; 264 (2): 353 DOI: 10.1097/SLA.0000000000001525
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Autor: monica boersch

Vor ein paar Jahre bin ich an Krebs erkrankt, bedingt durch meine Wertheim OP, Bestrahlung und Afterloading habe ich Lymphödeme bekommen, für mich sehr überraschend da ein paar Jahre dazwischen lagen, ich wusste das etwas nicht stimmt aber leider konnten unzählige Ärzte nicht helfen. Hier ist es auch so, wie in viele viele andere Länder auch, dass Lymphatische Erkrankungen erstens nicht wirklich ernst genommen werden und zweitens das kaum ein Arzt darüber Bescheid weiß, wie den auch, wenn in den Lehrbüchern so gut wie NICHTS steht. Mein Bestreben ist alles zu tun was in meiner Macht steht um dafür zu sorgen das jeder der betroffen ist weiß was er/ sie tun kann um sein Leben wieder so gestalten zu können wie er/sie das möchte. . Ich suche und suche immer weiter nach alternativ Möglichkeiten um meinen Leben so normal wie möglich zu gestalten. Die Empfehlungen die ich gebe sind bei mir durchaus wirksam und ich erziele gute Erfolge und behalte meine Lebensqualität. Mein Blog ist kein Ersatz für eine Ärztliche Betreuung und ich empfehle jeden mit seinem Arzt über Therapie Möglichkeiten etc. zu sprechen. Ich kann nur anregen und durch meine eigene, persönliche Erfahrung eventuell einen weg aufzeigen. Seit 2009 beschäftige ich mich weit über das übliche hinaus mit Lymphödeme. Nicht nur die „Diagnose“ interessiert mich, sondern ebenso was für einen Effekt es hat auf unser Sozialleben und unser Selbstwertgefühl. Ich habe viel Zeit und Geld investiert in andere Länder zu reisen um alternativen kennenzulernen, ich war bei Internationale Firmen als Gast um zu sehen welche Lösungen geboten werden, habe fast jeden Lymphologischen Kongress besucht um mich weiter zu bilden und einige Projekte als Freelancer machen können. Wie ihr sieht ist das weitaus mehr als nur ein Blog, es müssen sich grundliegende Dinge verändern um uns alle das zu geben was wir verdienen, Respekt, Empathie und das Bewusstsein das wir nichts Vorübergehendes haben, sondern das dieses ein Teil unseres Lebens ist und auch bleibt. After being diagnosed with Cancer and going through treatments, Wertheim operation, radiation therapy and afterloading I was suddenly hit by Lymphedema. Totally surprising since nobody even gave me a hint that this could happen. Running from one doctor to the other trying to find out what is wrong with me and why my body was changing so quickly, once again being in the situation of not having control of anything. This made me so angry that I started studying like crazy, I wanted to find out why we are left alone, why doctors don’t have a clue (sorry, most doctors) about Lymphedema and the consequences in all aspects of our lives. Sadly, I had to realize that hardly anyone knows anything about it. I started my quest to find alternatives in treatments, I traveled around the world investing my time and money, fortunate enough to spend time in companies specialized in Lymphedema treatment to learn all that I could and can. I hardly miss any Lymphatic congress, listening to the internationally known doctors, discussing what is important for us as patients. I have done some freelance work for the companies that I believe in and had the chance to work with a wonderful company in New Jersey. I have tested alternatives and I am still searching and studying because it is my quest to change things for all affected by this, not only our physical wellbeing but most importantly the impact that it has on our daily life. It’s not something that’s going to go away, it’s with us until the end and the minimum that we can expect is being taken seriously, respect and empathy for our situation and the importance for all of us that have the possibilities to change things for the better. There is so much work to do, and I am not going to give up. As you can see this is more than a blog. If you find something interesting on Lymphfantastic but you are having problems with the German, then just send me a message and I will be happy to translate that for you, my native language is English so that is no problem. Have a great day and looking forward to hearing from you soon. Bless you all, Monica

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